Computer Science Education: Innovation and Technology - CSEIT Conference

Selected Accepted Papers

Selected Accepted Papers

The standard measurements of modularization that are a mainstay of CS1 programming classes were defined in the late 1960s. Though a great deal has transpired in the ways of programming techniques and language technology, these measurements have remained largely unchanged. The purpose of this paper is to address shortcomings in these traditional measurements and to offer improvements to make them relevant in modern programming contexts.
This research study was devised to investigate and assess the impact on learning of providing video lecture recordings to a first year programming module of a university computing degree. The proliferation in the use of video lecture capture (LC) in universities worldwide presents an opportunity to analyse video watching patterns in an attempt to quantify and qualify how students engage and learn with the LC videos. The study considers behavioural trends of students towards watching LC videos and relates these factors to academic impact, especially focusing on academic attainment. The study finds that there are significant and measurable factors identifiable from LC video analytics that can be used to predict student academic performance early enough during a course to provide early warning indicators of struggling students, especially useful in mass education environments.
Among STEM disciplines, computer science has the lowest overall student retention rates. Yet employers are clamoring for more technology workers. Colleges in America, Europe, and elsewhere have not been able to keep up with the pace of industry job growth in computer science. In 2018, the World Health Organization will be adding gaming disorder to the list of International Classifications of Diseases. Gaming disorders are often demonstrated in individuals who play significant amounts of video games, particularly if they do so to the detriment of other social behaviors. This study, which took place at a small, computer-science focused institution, evaluated the gaming habits of incoming freshmen and upperclassmen students in computer science degrees. Significant levels of video game playing were found among both groups, indicating a potential rate of gaming disorder among these students that is higher than those found in studies among the general population of young adults. Given the data, there may be an increased correlation between tech-oriented computer science students and gaming disorders.